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June 7, 2016 — California Primary Election
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United States
June 7, 2016California Primary Election

United States Senate — ” Duf Sundheim, Candidate for Senator

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Duf Sundheim

Republican
Small Businessman/Mediator
584,251 votes (7.8%)
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  • Create better paying jobs and reduce the rising costs of housing and food
  • End the High Speed Rail and use those funds to help solve our water crisis
  • End Common Core, return control of our education system to local elected officials, make college more affordable
Profession:small business owner, mediator
Principal, GPS Mediation, APC (2001current)
Co-Founder, CEO and Board Member, CRAFT (20072010)
President, Doty, Sundheim & Gilmore (19862003)
Board Member, California Bipartisan Commission on Internet Political Practices — Appointed position (20002003)
Board Member, California Master Plan for Education, Emerging Modes of Delivery, Certification, and Planning Working Group — Appointed position (20002002)
General Counsel, Themed Entertainment Association (19912001)
Delegate, U.S.-Soviet Conference on the Law and Trade — Appointed position (19901990)
Delegate, U.S.-China Joint Session on Trade, Investment and Economic Law — Appointed position (19871987)
Northwestern University J.D., Law with the aid of an Exceptional Student Fellowship (1980)
Stanford University B.A. , economics with Honors and Distinction (1975)
Senior Advisor, Franklin-McKinley School District, Sylvandale Junior High Health Career Academy (20112015)
Co-Founder, Board Member, LINC, focused on education issues in the Latino community (20092015)
Senior Advisor, Yes on B, successful San Jose pension reform initiative (20112012)
Board Member, California Dream Team, largest donor to successful California redistricting initiative (20072010)
Chairman, California Republican Party (20032007)

Who Duf Sundheim Is 

 

Duf Sundheim’s aspiration is to help others achieve theirs.  Although he has never held elected office, working with his mentor, former Secretary of State George Shultz, Duf Sundheim has played a key role in enacting several historic reforms many had thought could never be achieved.  

 

Duf is a federal court approved mediator and spends much of his time working on education reform and providing mediation services in underserved communities.  

 

He and his wife of 32 years, Cheryl, are the proud parents of two adult children.  

.

Early Life and Education

 

Sundheim graduated with Honors and Distinction in Economics from Stanford University in 1975.  His Honors Thesis was on campaign finance reform.  Sundheim also earned two varsity letters on the Stanford football team. While at Stanford Sundheim ran “Volunteers for Youth,”  a program that matched Stanford athletes with children with self-esteem issues.  The program was so successful that upon graduation Sundheim and Chris Avery took the program national, eventually having programs at 54 campuses across the country.

 

Sundheim earned his Juris Doctorate from Northwestern University in 1980 with the aid of an Exceptional Student Fellowship.  While at Northwestern, Sundheim interned for a federal judge and the Better Government Association.

.

Career

 

Upon graduation from Northwestern, Sundheim joined the Silicon Valley law firm of Ware, Fletcher and Freidenrich.  In 1986 Sundheim and former Stanford classmate Stan Doty formed Doty & Sundheim.  Sundheim served as President of the firm until 2001.

 

During this period, Sundheim served as a delegate on the U.S.-China Joint Session on Trade, Investment, and Economic Law in 1987 and the U.S.-Soviet Conference on the Law and Trade in 1990.  He was President of the Palo Alto Area Bar Association, worked as an NFL Contract Advisor and General Counsel to the Themed Entertainment Association. For his work in the underserved community of East Palo Alto, Sundheim received the California State Bar Pro Bono Award.

 

Since 2001 Sundheim has been a Principal at GPS Mediation, APC. During this period he has been involved with many education reform efforts including co-founding LINC with Elias Chamorro and served as a Senior Advisor to the Superintendent of the Franklin McKinley School District in San Jose.  Their they developed a program that led to the doubling of the students on the Honor Roll.

 

Sundheim had been active in the Northern California Lincoln Club since 1990, chairing it from 2001-2003. But starting in 2000, Sundheim began to get more actively involved in California Republican politics. He served on the Committee to Reform and Restructure the Republican Party in 2001, along with several bipartisan committees and boards. In 2003, Sundheim ran for and was elected Chairman of the California Republican Party.

 

Successful Political Reformer

 

Sundheim shattered numerous records as Chairman of the California Republican Party.  Having never previously even been a delegate to the CRP, Sundheim ran as a reformer promising to shake things up.  Sundheim defeated the CAGOP Vice Chairman for the Chairmanship in 2003, the first time in 38 elections the Vice Chairman did not ascend to the Chairmanship.

In 2003, Sundheim played a key role in the only successful recall of a sitting governor in the history of California in 2003.  The very next year he ran a voter registration for which he received the RNC’s “Best Voter Registration Program in the United States,” and was appointed Chairman of the RNC’s National Voter Registration Task Force.

 

In 2006 under his leadership, the GOP set modern day records for the percentage of African Americans, Latinos, women and Asians voting for Republicans.  He served on the RNC Executive Committee from 2006-2007.  During his tenure as Chairman, Sundheim raised over $100 million (an all-time record).

 

Sundheim then took on two of the most powerful political forces in California — and won.  Prior to 2008, Nancy Pelosi and other political bosses drew legislative districts to ensure their reelection. Duf played a key role in passing an initiative that transferred that power to a citizen’s commission.

 

In 2012 Sundheim was a Senior Advisor to San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed and passed a pension reform initiative which saved San Jose taxpayers $1 billion.

 

U.S. Senate Candidate

 

In September 2015, Duf announced that he would run for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Senator Barbara Boxer. Since announcing his campaign, Sundheim has traveled over 37,000 miles, holding over 360 events across California.

 

He has received many high-profile endorsements; including Secretary of State George Shultz, John Chambers, Charles Schwab, Governor Pete Wilson, Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin – and the endorsement of every Republican legislative leader; including Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, State Senator Jean Fuller and Assemblyman Chad Mays.

 

Issues

 

Sundheim likes to take on the “unimaginable” and make it a political reality.  While he has repeatedly taken on powerful incumbents and interests and prevailed, he rejects the extremism on both sides of the aisle and instead focuses on reforms that have broad appeal, and hence are more likely to last. 

 

Sundheim’s goal is to bring that common sense, effective approach to Washington to:

 

•Create better paying jobs

•Get housing and education costs under control

•Solve our water crisis

•Reform our education system

•Keep us safe

 

 

Sundheim particularly emphasizes the plight of working-class. He writes a column for the Spanish-language newspaper, “La Opinion,” every two weeks, largely on economic and education issues.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duf_Sundheim

 

  • Former Congressman Tom Campbell
  • New Majority California
  • Former Secretary of State George Shultz
  • Jan Scully, Retired District Attorney, Sacramento County
  • State Assemblyman Marc Steinorth
  • San Jose City Councilman Johnny Khamis
  • San Pablo Mayor Rich Kinney
  • Hercules Mayor Dan Romero
  • Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren
  • State Assemblyman Scott Wilk
  • State Assemblyman Don Wagner
  • State Assemblyman Jay Obernolte
  • State Assemblyman Devon Mathis
  • State Assemblyman Rocky Chavez
  • State Assemblyman Katcho Achadjian
  • Republican Assembly Leader Chad Mayes
  • State Senator Jim Nielsen
  • Senate Leader Jean Fuller
  • State Senator Anthony Cannella
  • State Senator Pate Bates
  • Republican State Senate Leader Jean Fuller
  • Congresswoman Mimi Walters
  • Congressman Ed Royce, Chairman House Foreign Affairs Committee
  • Congressman Devin Nunez, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
  • Congressman Darrell Issa
  • Congressman Col. Paul Cook (Ret.)
  • Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin
  • Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy
  • California Small Business Association
  • Lincoln Club of Northern California
  • Steve Cooley, Retired District Attorney, Los Angeles County
  • McGregor Scott, Former US Attorney
  • Sam Blakeslee, former State Senator
  • Michael Boskin, Former Chairman, President’s Council of Economic Advisors
  • Bill Jones, former Secretary of State
  • John Chambers, Executive Chairman, Cisco Systems
  • General William Lyon
  • Bob Naylor, former Republican Assembly Leader, former GOP Chair
  • Charles Munger, Jr.
  • Ronn Owens, KGO radio
  • Charles Schwab
  • John Harris
1.
Federal Carbon Tax

Do you support the use of a federal carbon tax on the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by the use of fossil fuels (such as coal, oil and natural gas) as a means to both slow climate change and to reduce the deficit?  Why or why not?

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

 

My mentor, Secretary Shultz, is a proponent of a revenue neutral carbon fee.  I have not taken a position on this specific issue.  While I understand the benefits of discouraging the use of such fuels, I am concerned such measure would increase the cost of energy to American businesses and make them less competitive internationally.  And even if that concern were addressed, such measure would have to be revenue neutral (the proceeds would need to be distributed to the American people, not used to reduce the deficit).  

 

However, I do support the elimination of carbon subsidies such as the oil depletion allowance.

 

Climate change is real and humans are contributing to it.  There is a balance that needs to be struck between encouraging innovation and regulating conduct.  I believe we focus way to much on regulation and not nearly enough on encouraging innovation.  In traveling the state, I have seen first hand regulation tends to have a negative economic impact on America’s middle and lower classes.

 

 

In so many areas of our economy we have seen innovations such as Uber that have both lowered costs AND increased the quality of service.  In this area, I believe we have to focus on innovations that BOTH reduce pollution AND increase productivity.  Funding research is one avenue I will work to actively support.

 

 

 

2.
Gun Control

What is your stand on gun control laws at the federal level?  Please explain the reasoning behind your position. 

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

First, I am a strong supporter of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Second Amendment. Second, the primary role of government is to keep the people safe. Third, I am open to federal involvement only if state or local control is not effective. Consequently, I would oppose any new, federal legislation unless the sponsor was able to show there was a significant, national threat to public safety and state or local legislation would not be effective to address the threat. In California, we have the second stiffest laws on the books. Our problem is the Attorney General’s failure to enforce the existing laws designed to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and those who are unstable. Finally, I had a brother with a mental disability. My sister was a special education teacher. My wife Cheryl works with women in recovery. Many times the underlying cause of gun violence and gun-related tragedies is mental health. When I am in the United States, mental health issues will be a top priority.

3.
Trans Pacific Partnership

Is the Trans Pacific Partnership Trade Agreement good for California?  Would you vote to support it?  Please explain why or why not.

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

I support free trade and in general support the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Trade Promotion Authority.  However, I do have reservations about TPP in its current form.  More than 40% of California’s exports go to TPP countries, potentially making TPP a massive economic benefit to Californian workers, but I also want to make sure it doesn’t become a corporate give-away.

 

I believe free trade is both an avenue for economic growth and as an important diplomatic tool.  Moreover, we have witnessed time and again that as nations become wealthier, they have paid more attention to their local environment.  Trade is a crucial avenue to increase the wealth of the world, thereby benefiting the global environment.

 

Trade along with specialization and competitive advantage are the three cornerstones of economic development and economic progress.  They have improved not only the quality of life, but also the standard of living. 

 

In addition, history has shown if you are not at the table, other countries will still reach agreements.  Consequently, it is much better if we are at the table to ensure our interests are represented.  That said, when finalized and implemented, we ought to rigorously enforce trade agreements fully. 

4.
Marijuana

At the federal level, should recreational marijuana be legalized? Why or why not?

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

Simply, no.  Marijuana can be very destructive. I would not entertain federal legalization of marijuana.  Moreover, the United States is a member of a series of anti-drug international treaties, which prohibit the legalization of such substances.  We would have to sever important international relations in order to legalize marijuana, which is a poor trade-off for any preceived benefits legalization might have.

5.
Drought

The Federal Government plays a part in California water allocation and use through a variety of laws.  What, if any, legislation would you support in an effort to handle water shortages caused by the current and any future drought?

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

I will stop all federal funds going to the High Speed Rail and work with state and local officials to allocate those funds in three key areas:

 

*  Increased above and below ground storage

*  Increased recycling plants

*  Strategic use of small scale desalinization plants

 

In addition, I will work to ensure federal policy promotes making water markets function.  Such markets increase conservation by encouraging the more efficiient use of this valuable resource.  This is not only requires connecting willing sellers and buyers but also 

 

*  Reducing transaction costs by developing a public water market platform 

*  Clearly defining water rights as enforceable and transferable, and 

*  streamlining the trading regulatory review process.  

  

These are the specific steps I will work to enact.  However, water is an emotional as much as it is a legislative issue.  I will work tirelessly with all the stakeholders to ensure their voice is heard and they feel part of the solution.  And we must find a solution to an issue that is so central to the future of California.

6.
Immigration

Should immigration laws be changed?  What changes would you support?  Please explain why. 

Answer from Duf Sundheim:

It is no secret that our immigration system is broken.  We are one of the only developed nations worldwide to prioritize familiar immigration over economic immigration.  The world’s best and brightest and hardest working want to come to America and we ought to encouraging that and ought to have a system in place that makes it straightforward and fair.

For those who are here illegally, I do support a pathway to legal status. There are too many people in too many countries who have been waiting 10-20 years to enter this country legally to do otherwise.  But it is also unrealistic and would require a massive growth in government to deport all of these individuals. I also, emphatically, support a secure border.  The two must happen together.

I believe there is a fair and efficient way to create a pathway to legal status. There must be a probationary period, which would require pay back taxes, fines, and passing a criminal background check and English proficiency test.  During that probationary period, they must remain employed, not acquire a criminal record, and not be delinquent with their taxes. Only after this can they apply for legal status.

But just because we have a broken immigration system doesn’t mean state and local governments can ignore current law.  Sanctuary cities should be punished. State and local law enforcement must work with federal immigration officials.  Otherwise, more tragedies like Kathryn Steinle’s murder will occur.

Total money raised: $1,123,933

Below are the top contributors that gave money to support the candidate(s).

1
George "Duf" Sundheim
$749,967
2
Cisco Systems
$11,350
3
Landmark Technology
$5,500
4
Asset Management Company
$5,400
4
Crestwood Behavioral Health
$5,400
4
Dodge & Cox
$5,400
4
Epiphany Center
$5,400
4
Foster Care Counts
$5,400
4
ICG Advisors
$5,400
4
Matteson Realty Services
$5,400
4
National Collegiate Scouting Association
$5,400
4
Pritzker Group
$5,400
4
Sequoia Capital
$5,400
4
Stanford University
$5,400
4
Stephenson Foundation
$5,400
4
Underhill Investment Management
$5,400
4
WSJ Properties
$5,400

By State:

California 99.42%
Illinois 0.56%
New Jersey 0.27%
Florida 0.24%
Other -0.50%
99.42%

By Size:

Large contributions (98.18%)
Small contributions (1.82%)
98.18%

By Type:

From organizations (3.55%)
From individuals (96.45%)
96.45%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the Federal Election Commission.

The Second Age of Reason

 

We are on the cusp of the Second Age of Reason, one of the most exciting times in the history of man.

 

Before the first Age of Reason: the word was flat, and Kings and Queens ruled the world.  Then came the First Age of Reason, ushered in by the Gutenberg Bible.  We learned the world was round.  There was an explosion of philosophical thought.  And the American Revolution taught us that we did not need the Kings and Queens, that we could govern ourselves.

 

We are now on the cusp of the Second Age of Reason.  Technology, especially the smart phone, has totally transformed what we know and our ability to communicate with our 7 billion fellow human beings.  This has had a profound impact on the way we live, work, learn and play.  

 

Yet, it has had almost no impact on government.  In fact, as the world is moving faster and faster, it is more and more difficult for government to keep up.  This is one of the main frustrations people feel not only at the national level, but at the local level, where it can often take longer to get a building permit than it took us to beat the Germans!

 

Because of (1) the dispersement of knowledge, (2) our ability to communicate quickly and (3) our ability to track performance and hence keep others accountable, there is no longer the need to centralize nearly as much power in Washington as before.

 

Hence, my goal is to make Washington as relevant in the everyday life of the American people as Prince Charles is to the people of England. 

 

As former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pointed out, the American Revolution was one of the few successful revolutions in the history of civilization.  Hence, since revolutions seldom succeed, I support an orderly transition to a decentralized system as opposed to a revolution.  However, as is evidenced by the mood of the people and the inflammatory rhetoric of some candidates, this transformation must begin immediately.  We should encourage the states to take on more responsibility and using big data, learn from those experiments what works and what does not and make the necessary and continuous adjustments.

 

The second major concept in this area follows the first:  since there is so much knowledge and communication among up to 7 billion data points, it is no longer possible for one individual or group to have more knowledge than the people as a whole.  Hence, to truly represent the people of California, we are looking at ways to “crowd source” our campaign.  I will also attempt to do so as a member of the U.S. Senate.  And wherever feasible I will look to find ways to transfer power from all elected officials and bureaucrats to the people through crowd sourcing and concepts yet to be developed.

 

The Role of Emotions

 

The more facts we learn, the more we think we are behaving based upon this growing set of facts.  We thus are under the illusion we are becoming more and more rational.   But the more we study how we behave, the more we should realize we are not governed by our rational thoughts but by our emotions.  And this growing disparity between what we think we know and how we actually behave is one of the biggest threats we face today.  

 

  • It causes us to think we know more than we do (both in absolute terms and relative to others)
  • It causes us to overestimate our abilities and
  • It causes us to underestimate risk (for example, the risk of war) 

 

For the good of mankind and the safety of the world, we need to get our arms around this concept quickly.

 

One Possible Way to Shift from Gridlock to Problem Solving

 

I once had a mediation where the estranged parents (Mary and Mark, not their real names) were complaining the other was failing to meet their obligations to their child. They would not communicate these feelings directly, but would tell the child, “You tell your mother that if she continues to be such a jerk . . .” etc.

 

So at the mediation where only Mary and Mark were present, I just let them verbally punch themselves out.  After 45 minutes I told Mary:  “Mary, clearly there are many issues you have with Mark we are not going to be able to resolve today.  But clearly your son Bill is the most important thing in your life.  Is that right?”  To which I got a strong “Absolutely”.

 

I turned to Mark, “And Mark, the way you light up when you talk about Bill, is it fair to say he is the most important thing in your life?”  I received a similar, strong response.

 

Turning to both of them I said, “So can we agree, that for the balance of our time together, we will focus on what is in Bill’s best interest?”  To which they both agreed.  And for most of the rest of our time together, instead of complaining how the other was not meeting their obligations, Mary was volunteering to be the primary person with respect to homework and Mark was volunteering to focus on sports and other peer interactions. 

 

That is what we need in Washington today.  We are not going to resolve every dispute between Republicans and Democrats.  Neither side is going to “surrender”.  We need to stop blaming the other and start looking at what is in the best interests of the country and what each side can contribute to make that happen!

 

 

The beauty of this approach is that you do not have to give up what you believe, in fact, it honors what each side believes.  However, at the same time, it is equally critical that as we head down this path we don't forget we are just as emotional and just as flawed as the others.

 

Putting the American Worker First

Summary

With every economic vote I cast, I will ask one question:  "How does this impact the American worker?”  If it helps them, I will support it.  If it does not, I will oppose it.

 

Putting the American Worker First

In America, it used to be that it was not about where you came from, but where you were headed.  And whether you were 20, 30 or 50, you could achieve the dream you had for you and your family.  

For too many Americans, that is no longer the case.  In California alone, 49% of us live close to or below the poverty line. 

Americans feel the system is rigged.  Wall Street banks who made bad loans are bailed out while a single mother who takes out a loan to get an education can’t get such relief.  Multinationals sometimes pay next to nothing in taxes while many small businesses pay 35%.  Poor border enforcement and trade agreements that encourage the exportation of jobs contribute to more people competing for fewer jobs.  

There are four things we can do to dramatically improve the economic lives of the working men and women of this country.

Water.  The best way to improve the lives of working people is to identify those issues which, if addressed, would have a positive impact throughout the economy.  In California, the number one issue is water.  People cannot build homes or grow crops because of a lack of water.  With water we could build more homes in lower density areas which would create high paying construction jobs.  More water also would enable us to grow more crops, which would create jobs in our most depressed areas.  The benefits would not only be on the jobs side - a greater supply of homes would bring housing prices down and more food would lower its cost.

Consequently, I would stop all federal High Speed Rail dollars and use those funds to help solve our water crisis.

Resurrect Small Business.  It is disgusting the fastest growing path to the middle class today is a government job.  We can change that.  The number one creator of private sector jobs is small business.  We have a three point plan to make American small business the envy of the world and the engine of job growth:   

* Resurrect the community bank system to provide small business with access to capital.

* Get rid of the tax breaks and gimmicks that have nothing to do with improving the economy - and everything to do with taking care of the well-connected.  Then lower the marginal tax rates for individuals and businesses. 

The value of the reduction in the marginal tax rates to individuals is obvious.

In terms of businesses, it will enable small businesses that are not able to take advantage of such gimmicks to compete on a more equal footing.  It also will enable the trillions of dollars that are being parked overseas to come home to develop our economy instead of the economies of other nations.

* Dramatically reduce government regulations and put limitations on the scope of discretion bureaucrats have.

Control Our Borders.   I strongly support legal immigration.  However, to protect our workers we need to take control of our borders to prevent people from entering the country illegally.  There is a role for 5th Century B.C. technology (a wall) to help us achieve this goal.  However, we should have a triad approach:  

* A wall where cost effective

* Sensors, drones, big data in less populated areas

* Border officials with the manpower and tools they need to do the job.

Better Trade Deals.  Historically trade deals have focused on opening up markets to American goods and reducing the cost of goods imported into our country.  However, the American worker has not been well represented in this process.  Our trade deals need to do a much better job of taking the needs of the American worker into effect.  When I am in the U.S. Senate, I will ensure this is the case.

 

The bottom line:  When I cast my vote on economic issues, I will be focused on one issue:  “How does this law impact the American worker?”  If it either helps raise their pay or lower their costs, I will support it.  If it does not, I will oppose it.

 

How to Keep America Safe

Summary

The number one priority of our federal government is to keep America safe.  An effective foreign policy has four components: 1) Accurate Intelligence, 2) Thoughtful Diplomacy, 3) Innovative Technology , and 4) a Strong Military.

How to Keep America Safe

The number one priority of our federal government is to keep America safe.  That requires bold, balanced, and smart leadership. With geopolitical threats from Russia, North Korea, and Iran and terrorist threats from radical Islam, it is essential our nation has both a strong defense and maintain a robust offensive capacity.  

As a U.S. Senator, I will work to empower the four core pillars of an effective national security policy: 1) Accurate Intelligence, 2) Thoughtful Diplomacy, 3) Innovative Technology , and 4) a Strong Military.

Intelligence is one of the most important national security components.  If we don’t know where our enemies lie and what their plans are, it is impossible to prevent, deter, and combat them.  Accurate intelligence can prevent wars and if you are in a war, accurate intelligence is the difference between winning and losing.

Current law makes intelligence gathering cumbersome and despite efforts to better coordinate intelligence across agencies, there is much more to be done.  We need to empower our intelligence agencies, not politicize them.  We need to better coordinate our intelligence with our allies across the world, especially in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. And we must aggressively prosecute anyone who undermines our intelligence gathering and networks.

Diplomacy is essential to an effective foreign policy.  From the Truman Doctrine to the fall of the Soviet Union, leaders such as George Marshall and George Shultz helped the United States build long-lasting relationships abroad that played an invaluable role in keeping us safe.  

We need to stop thinking of the State Department as a separate foreign policy entity from our intelligence agencies and our military and better integrate its diplomatic efforts into a grand national security agenda. 

In Europe, NATO should be transformed to also focus on the threat ISIS poses to its members. In the Middle East, we ought to be building a coalition to combat a nuclear Iran and ISIS. In Asia, we should work with the Japanese, and the South Koreans and pressure the Chinese to prevent North Korea from attempting anything reckless.

Moreover, we ought to be using the economic might of the United States as a diplomatic carrot and the military as the stick.  As Theodore Roosevelt was apt to say, “Speak softly and carry a big stick.”

Technology can be the difference between success or failure in national security.  From muskets to sailing ships to computers, the entity that has mastered the latest technology usually has been the masters of their fate.  As the home of Silicon Valley, America should have a huge technological advantage, yet state actors like the Chinese and North Koreans have consistently hacked our government and terrorist organizations like ISIS have mastered the use of social media to recruit and propagandize.  

First, we need leaders who understand technology.  Second, we need to streamline the ability of our national security network to utilize the most innovative technology.  And third, technology must be thought of as a defensive and offensive priority.  As much as we should try to plug every hole in our technology network, we will never be able to do so.  People who try to undermine our network need to understand the price they will pay if they try.

Our military is the envy of the world thanks to the courageous men and women who serve in uniform. It is our most valuable national security treasure. But it is only effective in both preventing conflict and winning conflicts when it is undeniably the strongest military in the world.   

First, we must make investment in modernizing our military a key priority.  Second, we should prepare for the wars that haven’t been fought, not the ones we have.  Third, we should incorporate our military into our diplomatic missions.  These men and women are on the front lines and can be our most visible and effective diplomats. Fourth, we should leverage our military with strong alliances worldwide so that America isn’t alone fighting other people’s wars.  Fifth, we should never take military action off the table; it may not be the first option, but it must remain one.  Sixth, when we decide to engage our military, we must be prepared to do what it takes to win.  Leaving a combat zone with the mission unfulfilled creates new and more dangerous problems. And finally, we must work to ensure our veterans are cared for.  The current situation is shameful.

 

Protecting the American people is not only the most important priority; it also is one of the most difficult.  It takes persistence and clarity of vision.  In the Senate, I will have no higher responsibility than to do everything I can to keep the American people safe.

 

Imagining a New Age of Reason

Summary

Technology, has had a profound impact on the way we live, work, learn and play.  It has had no impact on government.  My goal is to make Washington as relevant in the everyday life of the American people as Prince Charles is to the people of England. 

Imagining a New Age of Reason

 

We are on the cusp of the Second Age of Reason, one of the most exciting times in the history of man.

 

Before the first Age of Reason: the word was flat, and Kings and Queens ruled the world.  Then came the First Age of Reason, ushered in by the Gutenberg Bible.  We learned the world was round.  There was an explosion of philosophical thought.  And the American Revolution taught us that we did not need the Kings and Queens, that we could govern ourselves.

 

We are now on the cusp of the Second Age of Reason.  Technology has totally transformed what we know.  It has also transformed our ability to communicate what we now know with our 7 billion fellow human beings.  It has had a profound impact on the way we live, work, learn and play.  

 

It has had almost no impact on government.  

 

In fact, as the world is moving faster and faster, it is more and more difficult for government to keep up.  This is one of the main frustrations people feel not only at the national level, but at the local level, where it can often take longer to get a building permit than it took us to beat the Germans!

 

Because of (1) the dispersement of knowledge, (2) our ability to communicate quickly and (3) our ability to track performance and hence keep others accountable, there is no longer the need to centralize nearly as much power in Washington as before.

 

Hence, my goal is to make Washington as relevant in the everyday life of the American people as Prince Charles is to the people of England. 

 

As former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pointed out, the American Revolution was one of the few successful revolutions in the history of civilization.  Hence, since revolutions seldom succeed, I support an orderly transition to a decentralized system as opposed to a revolution.  However, as is evidenced by the mood of the people and the inflammatory rhetoric of some candidates, this transformation must begin immediately.  We should encourage the states to take on more responsibility and using big data, learn from those experiments what works and what does not and make the necessary and continuous adjustments.

 

 

The second major concept in this area follows the first:  since there is so much knowledge and communication among up to 7 billion data points, it is no longer possible for one individual or group to have more knowledge than the people as a whole.  Hence, to truly represent the people of California, we are looking at ways to “crowd source” our campaign.  I will also attempt to do so as a member of the U.S. Senate.  And wherever feasible I will look to find ways to transfer power from elected officials and bureaucrats to the people through crowd sourcing and concepts yet to be developed.

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: California Secretary of State

Economic uncertainty and terrorist attacks have created anxious times. We want action from our leaders; instead we get excessive partisanship and a divisive, ineffective government. I promise to be different. I will be bold, balanced. I will find achievable solutions. California once was the “Land of Dreams”; aspiring to compete, to achieve—and to win for ourselves and our families. But that dream is being suffocated by leaders that have taken extreme positions. The result is businesses, our neighbors and our children are leaving California. Our schools are ranked 41st in the country. Taxes keep rising, and the cost-of-living is through the roof. This bleeding has to stop. I have the experience and passion to fix this. I graduated from Stanford and Northwestern Law. I solve problems for a living. I am a federal court approved mediator and volunteer settlement judge. I was Chairman of the California Republican Party, overseeing the only successful recall of a governor, and the first to be re-elected; because we got stuff done. Leaders from every segment imaginable are supporting my vision to renew the “California Dream.” Former Secretary of State George Shultz, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Cisco’s John Chambers, Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, The California Small Businesses Association. I am guided by the Constitution. My priorities are jobs, national security, education and water. Please visit SundheimforSenate.com for policy details. Integrity. Common sense. Results. They’re my foundation—and the foundation upon which we will bring back our “Land of Dreams.”

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