presents
Voter’s Edge California
Get the facts before you vote.
Voter’s Edge California
Go to top
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
KALW 2016 Election Guide@kalw
November 8, 2016 — California General Election
Invest in unbiased information

With your support, we can reach and inform more voters.

Donate now to spread the word.

Tax on Sugar-Sweetened BeveragesOrdinance

County
November 8, 2016California General Election

City and County of San Francisco
Measure V Ordinance - Majority Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Passing

237,168 votes yes (62.49%)

142,347 votes no (37.51%)

Shall the City collect a tax of one cent per ounce from the distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages?

Information provided by League of Women Voters San Francisco

The Question

Should the voters impose a tax on the distribution of some sugar-sweetened beverages?

The Situation

To discourage consumption of sugar- sweetened beverages, the White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity recommends that local governments implement a tax for such calorie-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages. The City of San Francisco does not impose a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages.

The Proposal

Proposition V would place a tax of one cent per ounce on the distribution of sugar-sweetened beverages. The distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages in San Francisco would be responsible for paying the tax. The tax would not apply to retail sales of sugar-sweetened beverages.

A sugar-sweetened beverage is a beverage that contains added sugar and 25 or more calories per 12 ounces. These include some soft drinks, sports drinks, iced tea, juice drinks and energy drinks. The tax would also apply to syrups and powders that can be made into sugar-sweetened beverages, for example, fountain drinks from beverage-dispensing machines.

Beverages that are not subject to the tax include:

  • Diet sodas;
  • Beverages that contain only natural fruit and vegetable juice;
  • Infant formula;
  • Milk from animal or vegetable sources, including soy, rice and almond milk;
  • Nutritional therapy, rehydration and other beverages for medical use; and
  • Alcoholic beverages.

A 16-member Advisory Committee would be established to evaluate the impact of the tax on beverage pricing, consumer purchasing behavior, and public health. The Committee would also advise the Mayor and Board of Supervisors about how to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in San Francisco. The City could use the proceeds of the tax for any governmental purpose.

A “YES” Vote Means: If you vote “yes,” you want the City to collect a tax of one cent per ounce from the distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages. 

A “NO” Vote Means: You do not want the City to collect a tax of one cent per ounce on the distribution of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Supporters say

  • Cigarette taxes have significantly reduced smoking, so a soda tax would reduce consumption of sodas and other sugary beverages. The diabetes epidemic reportedly contributes to $61 million in related health care costs in San Francisco.
  • Mexico instituted a soda tax and consumption has dropped 12-17%; San Francisco’s consumption is estimated to drop as much as 31% with a similar tax.
  • This tax can help address an emerging health crisis, especially in low-income communities and communities of color, where 1 in 3 children today will develop Type II diabetes.

Opponents say

  • A soda tax is a simplistic and ineffective solution to a very real and complex problem. Calories in soda are no more or less fattening than calories in other food.
  • A soda tax will hurt small neighborhood stores that rely on soft drinks for much of their revenue. The tax on the distributor will be passed onto the customer.
  • This proposed ordinance is paternalistic. Individuals should be able to choose what they eat or drink.

Summary

The Proposal: Proposition V would place a tax of one cent per ounce on the distribution of sugar-sweetened beverages.

A sugar-sweetened beverage is a beverage that contains added sugar and 25 or more calories per 12 ounces. These include some soft drinks, sports drinks, iced tea, juice drinks and energy drinks. The tax would also apply to syrups and powders that can be made into sugar-sweetened beverages, for example, fountain drinks from beverage-dispensing machines.

The distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages in San Francisco would be responsible for paying the tax. The tax would not apply to retail sales of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Some beverages would not be subject to the tax, including:

• Diet sodas;

• Beverages that contain only natural fruit and vegetable juice;

• Infant formula;

• Milk from animal or vegetable sources, including soy, rice and almond milk;

• Nutritional therapy, rehydration and other beverages for medical use; and

• Alcoholic beverages.

A 16-member Advisory Committee would be established to evaluate the impact of the tax on beverage pricing, consumer purchasing behavior, and public health. The Committee would also advise the Mayor and Board of Supervisors about how to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in San Francisco.

The City could use the proceeds of the tax for any governmental purpose.

A “YES” Vote Means: If you vote “yes,” you want the City to collect a tax of one cent per ounce from the distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages.

A “NO” Vote Means: If you vote “no,” you do not want this tax.

— Ballot Simplification Committee
Use tabs to select your choice. Use return to create a choice. You can access your choices by navigating to 'My Choices'.

On your actual ballot, you can vote 'yes' or 'no' on this measure.

Please share this site to help others research their voting choices.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION